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King Yin Lei photo
King Yin Lei photo1
King Yin Lei photo2
King Yin Lei photo3

Originally named “Hei Lo”, King Yin Lei at Stubbs Road, Mid-Levels was built in around 1937. The building was renamed as "King Yin Lei" in 1978.

King Yin Lei complex reflects richness and details in Chinese architectural features. The main chamber and its 2 wings have hip-and-gable roofs featuring a full set of traditional Chinese ornaments. External walls of the main building and the annex building are made of distinctively fine red fair-faced brickwork, whilst interior floors are finished with marble tiles, timber floorings and mosaics laid in various patterns. Windows with Chinese pattern metal muntins and grano finished window casings are adopted on the elevations. A grid pattern supporting system is used for the beams of the main halls on various storeys. For the round chamber to the west of the ground floor, a concentric radiating pattern is in place, imitating the coffer ceiling of traditional Chinese palace architecture. The complex also incorporates Western architecture style in terms of structure, material and plan. For instance, reinforced concrete was used to replace the traditional wooden structural roof members.

This historical residence could be most probably defined as an outstanding work of Chinese Renaissance style. Apart from being a popular spot for photography enthusiasts, King Yin Lei has also been featured in films of international renown and local television series. It also represents an earlier phase of Hong Kong history when the upper-class residential area took shape in the Mid-levels.

Kin Yin Lei was declared a monument in 2008. The monument, together with its garden, has been under the ownership of the Government for restoration and adaptive re-use. Since completion of the restoration in 2010, it has been opened to the public from time to time. The monument will be revitalised into a healthy living icon and a learning centre named “King Yin Kei – a Healthy Living Centre based on Pu’er Tea & Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)” under the Revitalising Historic Buildings Through Partnership Scheme. Prior to the completion of the revitalisation project, visitors can get a glimpse of the exterior of King Yin Lei whilst taking a stroll along Stubbs Road.

Website:

“King Yin Kei – a Healthy Living Centre based on Pu’er Tea & TCM”
https://www.heritage.gov.hk/en/revitalisation-scheme/batch-vi-of-revitalisation-scheme/selection-result/king-yin-lei/index.html

Events and Promotions
https://www.heritage.gov.hk/en/about-us/events-and-promotions/index.html

Transport

To plan your journey to King Yin Lei, visit the "HKeMobility" website (https://www.hkemobility.gov.hk) or mobile application developed by the Transport Department, and insert your starting point to search for routes of different transportation mode. Alternatively, you may click the “Journey” button in the Google Map below.

The information provided in this website is for reference only, and is subject to change in accordance with the announcement of relevant Departments or organisations. The Government does not make any express or implied warranty as to the accuracy, adequacy, reliability or timeliness in relation to such contents, and will not be liable for any errors in, or omissions from any such information.



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